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LA CHASSE (THE HUNT) - OUT NOW

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aRtist InteRvieWs

Francois Dillinger / Club Drippy / Mafgar / OmmenD. Strange / Lokua / Jace Inman / Vorp / DVS NME / SEL.6 / Flex Blur / KEEFE / Linquency / User Frndly / PV5000 / IVVY / Gino / Double Dipp / Clarissa

Chicago's Dark Heaven record label has officially launched and with that, the first various artists compilation was released on August 18th, 2023. La Chasse, which translates to “the hunt”, is a metaphor for pursuing the creative release that we thirst to have fulfilled as artists. The album explores a range of sounds that are heavily rooted within the underground dance music scene; through rhythmic 4x4 hitters, fast paced breakbeat, and moments of deep, leftfield electronica. La Chasse will take you on a journey through the minds of 19 producers spanning from all over the US, South America, and Europe. 

 

To give you a deeper look into all of the hard work that the artists have put into their tracks, we asked them some questions diving into their process and what they are hunting for now and in the future.

 

Dillinger

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

 

“I made this track during the pandemic and during the 2020 election as a protest piece. The vocals (as they always are) are my own, run through a TC-Helicon vocal fx processor. That's what started the track actually, and once I had that sound I built the most sinister vibe around it. I've changed my studio gear up significantly since then so I'm not entirely sure what gear I used but this was all done out of the box with final arrangement and mixing in Ableton. Currently my studio is in a whole different workflow and set of gear entirely and I'm focused on trying to make my own percussion sounds with a variety of analog and modular gear (I'm not an anti-sample person though). My main synths are the Sequential Pro-3, Arturia Polybrute, Norand Mono, Arp 2600m and a few others. I almost always use my DFAM on every track in some form or another and have some external fx I'm experimenting with too. My goal is never to be TOO comfortable and always learning new gear, new techniques and new combinations of sounds. I'm not a formula-building kind of producer that repeats a successful sound or arrangement. For better or worse I'm doing it from scratch every time (despite an Ableton template to record everything into at least). My live set has changed for about the 6th time now and I'm trying to make it as physically small as possible with still enough interesting ways to perform - so I use a Digitakt and Syntakt with or without a few different pedals.” 

 

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

 

“Yes, Detroit is in the DNA of everything I make. I envision a Detroit space every time I write - how would it sound here, or at this event, or reverberating off those walls? It's the complicated energy of a place that I pull into everything I do. It's not a matter of whether I think people will like it, but more so if I can feel it happening in a place that has inspired me; or within a moment that is etched in my mind. I have felt most connected to the music community here through my recent ambient live sets, as it's reconnected me to a culture of bootstrapped vision and high end diy-aesthetics. People who come together to support something that isn't about them, to build a world for a night that people can escape to - that's real power and it's only possible with a group of like-minded people. That's where I love to operate and exist. My part may not be 'important' per-say but being a part of it at all sure is.”

 

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

 

“I always feel like I'm on the hunt, or being hunted by something in my subconscious. Self-doubt and mental health have been a struggle for me so I'm mostly on the hunt for balance. I think when I'm at my best creatively I'm able to get out whatever fear and doubt I have and put it into the music which is why it often sounds dark. Part of that process also has me constantly hunting for who I am, both in the studio and in life. Defining and redefining something that will never be 'complete'. I still hunt though, for the most absolute expression of my voice, even if I know it's not a fixed point.”

 

Club Drippy

Club Drippy - Crashed

 

Mafgar

Mafgar - NeverNeed

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

 

“My process is horrible and no one should ever imitate it, but I do think separating the writing process, sound design process, and mixing process is really helpful. I got lost in gear fetish land for awhile and am totally fucking tired of all the 'dawless' stuff. It ruined my output and I basically made music I hated for years due to some belief it was somehow more legitimate, even though I had spent years prior writing music with a computer. I spend a lot of time making little sound design experiments with whatever sounds fun at the time and save them all in an unorganized folder. Ya never know what absolute trash loop you made completely out of context will inspire you later. The bass sounds in my track are from a bunch of recordings of bass experiments I was doing and I honestly couldn't tell you how I made them.” 

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

“Yes of course I would be absolutely lost without my local scene. Artists like papri chaat, c powers, nolid, othrwrld, shmuul, hobbess, lite drama, plaintiff, baby and probably so many more. I'm just trying to impress them and if they ask me for a track I'm working on I know I'm doing it right.”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing? 

“Slicing breakbeats exceptionally well.”

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

“My friend pirated Fruity Loops for me in the 10th grade and I've been through many different genres and methods since then. I'd like to think my music is less busy and maximalist but idk. I just wanna write brain ticklers that are still functional. It's hard and the legends make it look easy but riding the balance of danceable and brain melt is tough to master imo.”

 

Ommen
Ommen.jpg
Club Drippy Option 2.JPEG

 

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

 

“This track was part of my ‘make something in 1 hour’ practice. Track was made using hardware, including an octatrack, 808 clone, and a Moog synthesizer.”

 

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

 

“Community absolutely shapes my artwork. Community is belonging. I make music to discover belonging, both within my inner and external worlds.”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

“I spend my life chasing meaning.”

What is something you would like to change about music or the industry? 

“I’d like to see music centered less around capitalism and profitability. Also, less shaped by social media.”

 

Ommen - a few things wrong with me

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

 

“I moved my instruments into a vacant house and set up everything in the central living space. At night I would power up everything and just play around. I was really fixated on recording drum machines and trying to make those parts sounds alive and breathing. Getting to know the instruments and their personalities can be a really fun time.” 

What is something you'd like to change about music or the industry?

 

"Fair compensation for artists. I also think if we want great art in this world we need to better support creativity and exploration, especially at a young age. This would include more accessibility to art education, music programs, etc. I feel like we should completely revolutionize art education and make it free for everyone."

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing? 

"I've spent most of my life studying and pursuing art and connecting with other creatives and I don't really see that changing any time soon."

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

"I've been drumming for 20 years and started writing music when I was 18. My earlier tracks were mostly programmed beats with layered guitar recordings. Once I moved to Chicago, I got into Native Instruments Maschine and started taking production more seriously. These days I'm more interested in hardware instruments and ambient music."

 

D. Strange
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D. Strange - Eros

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

 

“The track was created on the elektron digitakt with minor post editing in ableton. I'm currently integrating the korg minilogue and casio cz-5000 into my studio process.” 

What is something you'd like to change about music or the industry?

 

"I wish people would shed their ego. We are only vessels to the music. It isn’t about You and it never be. As far as the industry all I can say is that music only suffers if the only goal is to attain external validation or money."

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing? 

"Always searching for what I hear in my head. . . what I hear in my dreams."

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

"I’ve been making music for 5 years. What I’ve learned with time is you can’t force a damn thing but you can make the path towards that sonic texture easier to find. One day I will write the original score for a horror or science fiction film. Tell Ari Aster I wanna work."

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

“My community is immensely important to my art. It's that community of likeminded individuals of varied backgrounds but specifically black ones (who speak this unwritten language of experimentation) that inspire me to continue on.”

 

Lokua
Lokua - image6 - Joshua Kleckner.jpeg

Lokua - Keep It Going

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“Overall there are two major phases to my creative process. The first is making sounds while the second is making songs or parts built from those sounds (these phases can happen separately or in tandem). I spend a lot of time making drum sounds and textures using my beast of an analog modular synth and recording those into various hardware samplers. This allows me to devote my entire studio to each and every sound and in the end gives me a high level of satisfaction knowing every single sound was meticulously built from the ground up (I literally have my "own sound"). So anyway, in the case of Keep It Going, I'm sitting on top of a wealth of hand-made drum samples and a wall of modular and nothing to do but start patching, add some movement, then bang it out. This is one of those single-session tracks I didn't obsess much over - just wanted to feel good at the time.”

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

"I've been really inspired by the resurgence of underground music culture here in Chicago. Seems like things were in kind of a lull in the last decade leading up to the pandemic. Now people are throwing park jams, warehouse raves, camping festivals, and really supporting not just DJs but live performers and visual artists as well. There's a certain "we came to get down" + "fuck the establishment" energy that fits right in with all the influences I had growing up. If anything I do is important to this community and the music scene in general, it's that I have an arsenal of "what works" gained from failing over and over again for a long time."

What is something you'd like to change about music or the industry?

"I gave up on the industry a long time ago. But one thing I wish I could change on a cultural level is people just dancing in uniform, all staring at the DJ. It's a party not a concert! Move around! I just miss the days when we were doing dances that had names. DJs still play The Percolator and I look around and nobody can actually DO the percolator. Don't get me wrong - I'm generalizing here - it's not all gone, but yeah, I do hope we can start seeing a larger resurgence of dance cultural with an emphasis on DANCE."

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

I started spinning jungle, house, and hip-hop my freshman year of high school. By the end of high school I was making beats and selling instrumental tapes. After majoring in music composition I was producing various groups and selling beats to solo artists when I eventually connected with my pals Slava and Garo, and together we formed the Moment Sound collective and label. We focused on Live PA of all genres with residencies all over the city until around 2012. Since then I've continued to hone my craft as a Live PA artist and producer, releasing music along the way, cozying into a minimalist jack techno style. In addition to my single on La Chasse, I recently self released a new album called Paths. With that behind me, other than focusing on my live act, I am a blank slate and open to where the paths of rhythm will take me.

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

As a performer I've been chasing the ability to completely freestyle my live sets, 100% improvised. No premade patterns, sounds, or anything. I've gotten pretty damn close but will not force this on anyone until I can do it in a way that is better than my current approach (which is still live, but also relies on existing patches, patterns, and sounds).

 

Jace Inman
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Jace Inman - Gamma Wave Deflection Error

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“I had just received a new hardware drum machine, and the goal was to only use that single piece of kit for the track. All of it was live improvised. I took a few recordings, spliced together some of my favorite parts, and the rest is history. As Prov said, the composition "reminds me of being at a rave". It's unhinged and the perfect summation of my sound.””

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

"I started tracking out in Ableton in 2010, things got more serious in 2017 onward. My latest endeavors have been pushing myself and Venosci's event series called Heavensware (next event on August 18). Strictly live sets, pure madness. The goal is to keep pushing out quality, genre-bending tunes geared toward the dance floor. I won't stop til the wheels fall off."

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

"Chasing the perfect beat, and the perfect sound systems."

What is something you'd like to change about music or the industry?

"Fuck money."

 

Vorp
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Vorp - Bow & Arrow

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

 

“One of my childhood friends sent me a vinyl of Portishead's Dummy album for my birthday in 2022 which felt so nostalgic listening to after not hearing their music for a long time. While prepping for a gig, I couldn't find a remix that was appropriate for me so I said 'hmm, why not?" and felt inspired to flip "Glory Box" into a fast, club, breakbeat, electro/techno track. I sampled some drum loops from a jungle/dnb folder, some quirky & noisy sound effects and more drums from an OP-1, the acid bass is from Spectrasonics Trilian VST, and I modulated a handful of Ableton's mixing plugins to create movement & liveliness - they'll never seize to amaze me what they're capable of.

 

Lately, I've been trying to use as much analog sound as possible just with my OP-1 and Prophet Rev2. I would love to explore drum / groove machines and learn how to produce fully out of the box and eventually perform live analog sets.”

What is something you would like to change about music or the industry? 

“Many things! Streaming royalties... it's totally insane that playlist curators earn 6 figure incomes when the artists on the playlists might only earn around $4000 when they own 100% of the rights to their song that garnered 1 million streams.

 

Locally, I'd love to see more promoters collaborating on events and generally supporting each other more. Sometimes, it feels like everyone is kinda doing their own thing. If we all came together, we could throw one hell of a festival! Also, I'd love to see more of the underground DJs hitting the club circuit more... Chicago has a lot going on in the electronic music scene, but the communities often feel very divided.”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

“I think I will always be on the hunt to travel the world and if I can perform music while I'm at it then that will be the biggest bonus.”

 

DVS NME

DVS NME, Sel.6, and Flex Blur dive deeper into their tracks and how they all found music production through Playstations in their earlier years.

DVS NME .jpg

DVS NME - Herr Elektromotoren

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

 

“At the time of producing the track I had just finished watching Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul back to back. I was heavily influenced by the soundtrack of the shows and ended up naming it based on the Madrigal Elektromotive corporation in the show.”

 

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

 

“Recognition from the musicians I respect.” 

 

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

 

“20+ years. I began using a Playstation video game called 'The Music Generator', moved into proper DAWs like Reason and ended on hardware synthesis as my current mode of conveyance.”

Dark Heaven Co-Founder, Vorp dives into the exploration of making his track and his hopes for artists within the music community.

SEL.6
SEL.6 .jpeg

SEL.6 - GOOD GRIEF

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“I wanted to contribute something that I thought fit best with the overall setting. The name in itself "Dark Heaven", inspired me to create something with both a dark and ethereal sound simultaneously. With that being said, my process included a hunt for celestial sounding pads and FX to help accomplish that.”

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

“My journey started over a decade ago at least. At my earliest memory, it began with music-making video games such as MTV Music Generator for the PS2. From there, I graduated to downloading trial versions of various DAWs that were available at the time (late 2000s), and using those as long as I could. I like to think that my experiences with these platforms during these times of growth, as well as the sounds heard during this time and prior, all helped shape what I currently produce. I can only hope to continue to build on my sound and evolve.”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

“Dissonant chords and frequencies.”

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

"Thankfully, I can say my community does impact and uplift me in my process and my art. My peers' contributions also inspire me in many ways, and motivate me to keep moving forward. I do believe that my work serves as a solid contribution to the current Miami sound, and beyond."

Flex Blur

Flex Blur - Doute

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“I had missed hearing and making Jungle tracks, and wondered what happened if I just threw a bunch of drum breaks together at high-speed, after years of not doing so. There isn't any equipment that I'm fixated on, although I have been tidying my digital studio for months now, carefully handpicking the plugins that I want to work with, and am about ready to make music again in a hopefully less scarce and more efficient way.”

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

“I have been making music for 23 years now, started on PlayStation with Music 2000. I've learned to make music in any genres that I liked, put emotions in my work, clean the sound quality of my tracks. I'm not sure where I want to go now as the music I want to hear is already made out there, but I'm probably looking for my own sound now, which seems to be the hardest. Surely I want to add more of my mother tongue (French) in my tracks, as the world's globalisation is merely American and people unconsciously use the English language systematically, only to fit in and get noticed worldwide. Maybe I want to go more vocal, organic and raw on another project of mine that I have yet to start…”

What is something you would like to change about music or the industry? 

“More tolerance, discussion and acceptance; less cringe, image and narcissism.”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

“Beauty and truth.”

KEEFE

KEEFE and Linquency give us some insight into the donk and honk energy on their tracks.

Keefe Option 4.jpeg

KEEFE - Big Donk Energy

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“Haha I think I saw that donk video on YouTube then wanted to write a song with a donk, and this came out :)”

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

“I started play drums when I was 12, eventually started a band called Jack Torrance and that was sick af. Then I focused on college for 3 years. Haha and then about 5 years ago I found ableton. Now I spend my time tuning kick drums on my computer :)” 

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

“My music is important to me, and it feels nice seeing people dance to it, it’s also encouraging when my friends play my songs.”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing? 

“I want a sailboat, so maybe that.”

Linquency
Linquency.jpeg

Linquency - One Twisted Honk

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

 

“I started off by throwing together that weird lead synth in Ableton’s sampler. I just pulled in a random sample, shrank the loop region to a tiny sliver, and it all fell together from there. You can get some very wild and ugly sounds like that.”

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so? 

“People love using the term “oversaturated”, but I quite like the richness of the local dance music scene. There are so many DJs playing so much music, I’m constantly finding new music that inspires me. Contributing my own unique work to this rich community is a great way to show my take on how fun and carefree making dance music can be, so that maybe more non-producing DJs can think “it’s time to start making the music I wanna spin.” It’s easy I promise.”

What is something you would like to change about music or the industry?

“I wish crowds at parties weren’t so distracted by networking… please leave me a message, I’m trying to dance!”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

“My tail.”

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

"I grew up playing drums in churches, since I was really young, like 10 or something. I learned how to read music so I could be in marching band in high school and I went on to compose/arrange their field show after I graduated. I continued to write music in this realm of contemporary classical, with my sights set on film scoring someday. Sheet music is boring though and it doesn’t make a sound on its own (boo!!!!). Sharing these works in the way I wanted them to be heard was difficult without my own personal orchestra to record. So, I downloaded whatever VSTs and Kontakt Instruments I could get my hands on and became obsessed with the sound of my portfolio pieces. So, I slowly morphed from composer to producer. Now I’m morphing from producer to goated producer."

User Frndly

Rhythmic heavy hitters UserFrndly, PV5000 and IVVY talk about the sounds that inspire their tracks on the VA and how the communities they live in impact their music.

User Frndly.jpeg

User Frndly - COMMON GROUND

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp. 

“The process in creating the track was making something easy yet effective for everyone to play out. Not getting too lost in the automation/mixing down part of tracks has been very helpful as it lets us stay in the direction of letting our ideas just flow.” 

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

“Yes. Our music is what we see and feel on a day to day basis.” 

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing? 

“Top quality food and new plugins.”

PV5000
PV5000.JPG

PV5000 - DJ Do Baile

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“The production of my music was all done on my computer, since here in Brazil having a drum machine or a synthesizer is very expensive. I'm known for sampling Funk BR vocals, so I loved the vocal track I sent you guys!”

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

“My community definitely makes a big impact on my art! Firstly, because I am Brazilian and since I was a little boy I have consumed a lot of Brazilian music, genres that only exist here - because we are a third world country - such as funk, samba, pagode, forró, sertanejo, brega, among other musical genres, Brazil is a musical power. I'm also very influenced by my trans community, because of that I use a lot of urban and noisy elements, I like to mix musical genres and fast BPM, I like the kick that hits "like testosterone in the blood". My sound is generally dirty, with acid timbres and the bass is always very striking, my creations have an aesthetic of something subjective from my childhood experiences and what I live in everyday life.”

What is something you'd like to change about music or the industry?

"As a person who lives in a third world country I would like us to be seen more and have more opportunities, it's very difficult to make a living from music around here, even more so when you are part of an underground scene, you don't even have money to buy the equipment that I would like to be able to produce, I think we are already on this path of being more seen and valued."

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

"Since I was five years old, when I learned to play the piano, I chose music to communicate with the world. I come from a Catholic family in a small town in the south of Brazil, I joined the church band in my community very early, and soon evolved my studies to strings and percussion. At my grandparents' house, still during childhood, I had contact with many records, which created a true passion for analog recording. In this space, I broadened my musical discovery: I got to know classics from Brazilian cultural movements such as tropicália and bossa nova, and I studied the rare shellac records of sound effects. I also participated in independent bands in the region as a teenager, as a guitarist and drummer, creating experiences with performance and composition. Already at the age of twenty, I started DJing in bars in the center of the capital, with a repertoire based on Brazilian contemporary music: joining tracks from MPB, RAP BR and Funk BR. That democratic style, together with the ever-improving technique, took me to bigger nightclubs. In 2017, I performed at the closing party of the 12th Bienal do Mercosul along with other Latin American artists. Later, I had my first contact with electronic music, that's when I noticed that I could communicate through digital noises, in fact, I was the conductor of my technological orchestra. At the age of twenty-five, I founded the collective GRETA, opposing the very common sexist demand in electronic music. In 2019 I founded the T collective together with a 100% TLGBQIA+ team. T already stands out in underground music in the region, with a 90% trans team, which manages to think of an even more open and inclusive environment for the nightlife scene. My cultural activism added to his talent as a DJ made him circulate in all the most important booths in my city, and in several other cities in Brazil and Uruguay. I had authorial songs released on stamps in Serbia, Australia, Portugal, Ecuador, USA, Canada... In addition to sets for Canada, Korea, USA and Germany, creating bridges between countries and making a lot of people dance. My dream is to get to know other countries live, to get to know other clubs, other DJs, I want my music to allow me to get to know the world!"

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

“I have a dream of discovering the world with my music, and of being able to pay for a nice trip for my mother too, to give her and my sister nice things from my work as an artist. I've almost given up working with music several times, but in the end, music hunts me.”

IVVY
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IVVY - Unstable

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“All my tracks are expressions of raw emotional content; their purpose is to connect with ravers on the floor and to give DJs a legitimate piece of art that can serve as a tool in a set.”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

“Nope have everything I need, love, and music.”

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

“I make my work strictly for my community. They know it's a gift and I'm happy to give it to them.”

Gino
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Gino - Detroit Receiving

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“This track was made in the winter during a tough personal time as an expression of some of the darker feelings that I was feeling. It became very cathartic and I can't even recall the process of designing the sounds. It came like a dream.”

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so?

“Music is about connection to yourself or others so I think community is a huge part of my creative process. Art is made to share, great art makes change and brings people together.”

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go?

“I've been DJing for 10 years and producing for 3. I got into it just because I had an inner drive to do so. I don't use a ton of gear, my music theory knowledge is admittedly weak, but I know a good groove. Producing is one of many of my creative focuses so I'd like to just develop some consistency with my releases and dive deeper into the craft over time.”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing?

“Enlightenment” 

Double Dipp
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Double Dipp - Shock Me

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“This track was an experiment in a simple yet effective formula I’ve grown to enjoy in dance music. The formula for me is to create tracks with just a few melodic elements that are ever-evolving. Changing just enough to keep the track moving, but always able to snap back to 1 so as not to ever stray too far from where it came. The goal was to create loops complex enough to not hear the pattern, but repetitive enough to be catchy and addictive.”

Does your community make an impact on your art? Do you feel as if your work is important to your community and beyond? How so? 

“My community has a constant impact on my creative output. I’m so inspired by the music I hear when I go out and from the other artists around me that share their music with me. I can only hope that others feel the same about my music and we can continue to feed off one another!”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing? 

“My sound! I’m so inspired by music old and new and always taking inspiration by what’s most recently left an impact on me. No matter how refined I get as an artist, I’m confident I’ll always be hunting for the next evolution of my sound as a producer and DJ.”

Clarissa
Clarissa pic - Clay Adamczyk.jpeg

Clarissa - An Ode To Nothing

Tell us a little bit about your contribution to the comp.

“This track came together a lot differently than previous works. I was just coming out the other side of a bad accident recovery, and only just returned to Chicago having not lived here for 16 years, and meeting a whole bunch of great new people as a result, and what was starting to come out of me was trax that were a lot more bouncy and melodic than my usual.”

How long have you been making music? Where/how did you begin, how have you evolved and where would you like to go? 

“On and off for 5+ years or so. Hasn't been too serious yet but that's been changing over the last year and I feel my production is starting to get more to where I want it to be, with still endless room to grow. Coincidentally, the first track I ever finished I titled 'The Hunt.'”

The compilation title, La Chasse, translates to “the hunt,” is there something you could spend your whole life chasing? 

“I know I will forever be chasing new music and new to me music. Can't stop, won't stop.”

~ Edited by Caleb Foland ~

LA CHASSE - OUT NOW

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